“Never Say Never Again” Next in Classic Movies Series

“Bond.  James Bond.”

Ever since the first time he spoke these words to Miss Sylvia Trench in 1962’s Dr. No, nobody’s done it better than James Bond.  With his Aston Martin and other flashy cars, never-say-never-againinsistence that his martinis be “shaken, not stirred,” and his tempestuous love life, what isn’t there to love about the suave secret agent with the license to kill?  Downtown Friday Nights Classic Movies, hosted by the Sumter Opera House in their continuing tribute to 1983, presents Never Say Never Again this Friday night, March 8, at 7 p.m.

Upon its initial release, this adaptation of 1965’s Thunderball created great excitement among Bond fans, as it featured the return of Sean Connery.  Connery, who played Bond in six films from 1962 to 1971, had said after the release of 1971’s Diamonds are Forever that he would “never again” play James Bond—hence the film’s title.  Never Say Never Again features an older Bond, called out of retirement for a final mission—to retrieve stolen nuclear warheads from the megalomaniac Maximilian Largo, who plans to use them to blow up Washington, DC.

Originally based on a series of novels by Ian Fleming and one of the most popular film franchises ever, Bond’s adventures have now spanned six decades.  The combination of exotic locales, chase scenes, sophisticated weapons, cars, women, and a charismatic, flirtatious hero with a wicked sense of humor have given James Bond the most longevity of any character in movie history.

Of course, there will always be differences of opinion on what actor was the quintessential Bond.  Agent 007 has been portrayed in movies by Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton, Pierce Brosnan, and currently, Daniel Craig.  Each actor brought his own distinct qualities to the character (sometimes creating controversy—who else remembers the uproar over the casting of a blond actor as Bond in 2006’s Casino Royale?).  But despite the fact that Roger Moore holds the record for appearances in “official” (Eon Productions) films, for many who grew up with the series, Sean Connery set the standard by which others will always be measured.

The Sumter Opera House is located at 21 North Main Street.  Admission is only downtown-friday-nights-for-website$2.50 per person, for an evening of suspense and adventure.  Never Say Never Again starts at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30, so get there in time for vintage cartoon reels!); popcorn and bottled water will be available for purchase.  Proceeds benefit the Sumter County Library children’s programs.  For more information, please check our events calendar online here, or call the Swan Lake Visitors Center at (803) 436-2640.

If you’ve never seen Connery’s portrayal of the iconic adventurer, here’s your chance to see what all the fuss was about!

by Colette Daniels

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2 Responses to “Never Say Never Again” Next in Classic Movies Series

  1. Passions says:

    Simple Sean Connery was old and not fit to be 007 anymore

  2. Thank you for your comment. Sean Connery, who was 41 when he starred in 1971’s “Diamonds Are Forever,” felt the same way. However, he was not the oldest Bond. Roger Moore, who is three years Connery’s senior, turned in his badge in 1985, the year he turned 58–five years younger than Connery when he appeared in “Never Say Never Again.”. The youngest Bond has been George Lazenby, who was 30 when he filmed “On Her Majesty’s Secret Service.” Daniel Craig, the present 007, is in his mid-forties–but if 60 is the new 40, we may be seeing him onscreen for some time to come!

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